Emily Richardson – Redshift (UK 2001, 3:46 mins.)

In astronomical terminology redshift is a term used in calculating the distance of stars from the earth, hence determining their age. Redshift attempts to show the huge geometry of the night sky and give an altered perspective of the landscape, using long exposures, fixed camera positions, long shots and timelapse animation techniques to reveal aspects of the night that are invisible to the naked eye.
The film has a gentle intensity to it, and is composed of changes of light across the sea, sky and mountains. It shows movement where there is apparent stillness, whether in the formation of weather patterns, movement of stars, the illumination of a building by passing car headlights or boats darting back and forth across the sea’s horizon.
The sound has been composed for the film by Benedict Drew, taking field recordings of the aurora borealis as a starting point, and using purely computer generated sound to create a soundtrack that reflects the unheard elements present in the earth’s atmosphere.

BIO: Emily Richardson is a UK based artist who creates film portraits of particular places. Her work focuses on sites in transition and covers an extraordinarily diverse range of landscapes including empty East End streets, forests, North Sea oil fields, post-war tower blocks, empty cinemas and Cold War military facilities. Richardson’s films have been shown in galleries, museums and festivals internationally including Tulca 2012, Ireland; Chisenhale Gallery, London; Botkyrka Konsthall Sweden; The Wapping Project, London; Artprojx Cinema at the Armory Show, New York; FACT Liverpool; Tate Modern and Tate Britain, London; Uppsala Museum, Sweden and Venice, Edinburgh, London, Rotterdam and New York Film Festivals.
She was awarded the Gilles Dusein Prize, Paris 2009 in recognition of her films. Her work is distributed by LUX, London.